News

The Human Element in Conservation in the Congo

The Human Element in Conservation in the Congo

This summer, Rachel’s Network Member Ashley Stone flew into the heart of the Democratic Republic of Congo with Dr. Takeshi Furuichi and Dr. Chie Hashimoto to observe wild bonobos at the Luo Scientific Reserve, the original bonobo research station started in the 1970s by Dr. Takayoshi Kano. She recounts why conservation must address local livelihoods to succeed.

Heeding the Canary in the Coal Mine on Climate Change

Heeding the Canary in the Coal Mine on Climate Change

Scientists with the National Audubon Society have found that of the nearly 600 bird species that call North America home, over half are already threatened by climate change. Thankfully, says Audubon Washington’s Executive Director Gail Gatton, there’s a policy prescription that economists, environmentalists, and scientists all agree will make a huge difference: putting an effective price on carbon emissions. Gail shares how her organization is getting out the climate vote in Washington State.

A Conservation Success Story: Bracken Cave

A Conservation Success Story: Bracken Cave

In October 2013, Rachel’s Network members took a special excursion during our Fall Retreat to Bracken Cave, which at the height of summer houses approximately 15 million Mexican free-tailed bats, the largest concentration of mammals in the world. Earlier that year, BCI had learned that a planned 3,500-house subdivision would threaten the bats’ habitat. It was a conservation challenge like no other, but BCI rose to meet it. With the support of countless partners, they saved Bracken Cave.

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